World Series Winners Never Lose to Division Rivals

You’ve heard it countless times from talk show radio hosts and internet commentators galore. There are things that good teams just don’t do. The most important of these is something the Nationals (who aren’t a good team) just finished doing this weekend. At 1-5 against the Atlanta Braves the Nationals are well on their way to losing the season series. The Braves only have to go 5-8 in the remaining 13 games to take the season series from the Nationals and that it is a lot better than the 9-4 the Nationals would have to go. The fact of the matter is the Nationals are already doomed.

Winning one run games, always scoring the runner from third with less than two outs, and winning season series against division rivals is something every World Series team of the last 100 years has done. Sense I’m too lazy to look up the last 100 years we’ll go with the last ten and I’ll prove that no World Series team has ever lost a season series to a division rival ever.

The 2013 World Series champion Boston Red Sox were 11-8 against the Blue Jays, 12-7 against the Rays, and 13-6 against the Yankees. Those are all obvious winning records the one that some of you people may have difficulty understanding as a winning record is the Red Sox 8-11 mark against the Orioles, but it is a winning record because the Orioles weren’t a playoff team or even close to a playoff team or a team without a high payroll and therefore they don’t count as a baseball team so how can a non-baseball team win against a baseball team? See, wasn’t that simple?

The Giants of 2012 worst record against a division foe was 9-9 to the Arizona Diamondbacks and while it isn’t a winning record it isn’t a losing one either and if something isn’t losing then it is the opposite of losing which is winning.

In 2011 the Cardinals may have gone 6-9 against the Reds but they went 9-9 against the division champion Brewers and since those wins were against a better team they count double so really the Cardinals were 18-9 against the Brewers and since those wins are transferable they were 10-9 against the Reds and 14-9 against the Brewers. Both winning records, and that doesn’t even mention the fact that the Cardinals beat the Brewers in the playoffs where wins are triple. That is even more wins for the Cardinals in the division.

The San Francisco Giants on paper were 6-12 against the division runner up San Diego Padres, but forget the Padres 8-3 record against the Giants coming into September. As baseball historians have proven time and time again wins in September are worth far more than wins in any other month and since the Giants went 4-3 against the Padres in September nothing that happened April through August even counts, and last I checked 4-3 is a winning record.

I said I was going to do this for the past ten seasons but I’m getting tired and my back hurts a little so pretend I wrote about 2005-2009. You can look it up on baseball reference and apply the logic I taught you and you’ll see no World Series winner has ever lost to a division rival in the history of ever. But that still leaves one season to look at the 2004 Boston Red Sox. Not only did they not have a losing record to a division rival, and remember the Orioles don’t count, they also broke the biggest curse in baseball and came back from three games down in the ALCS to destroy the Yankees. So given the extra value of those wins and all that that team went like 162-0. Truly impressive.

From this look at history it is obvious that no good team, and especially World Series winning teams, has ever lost a game to a division rival. The Nats simply have to step up against the Braves or they’ll have no shot at winning a World Series or even making the playoffs and then the window closes and the 2012 Strasburg Shutdown becomes the biggest blunder in baseball history.

One comment

  1. How many WS teams were thoroughly dominated by a division opponent? Plenty of season left, but that’s how it’s shaping up again.

    Like

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